Posts Tagged 'sport'



Sticking to Your Guns: Shooting Etiquette Faux Pas

shootingOctober sees the pheasant, woodcock and capercaillie shooting season begin and so listed below are The English Manner’s top etiquette blunders to avoid at all cost when out in the fields.

-       Never attend a shoot if you have never held a gun or had adequate training. Being dangerous is considered frightfully rude

-       Pick up all spent cartridges at the end of drives. This used not to matter but now in the environmentally-friendly society we live in, it is considered bad form not to

-       Make sure you mark your quarry for pickers-up and their dogs: never leave a dead bird to rot

-       Always ask what one is allowed to shoot before commencing. Hosts will have different rules from each drive to the next

-       The polite guns never boast about their scores

-       In the unfortunate circumstance that one shoots something that one is not supposed to, or that you cause a fellow gun an injury, it is expect that you leave the party immediately. Other guns are expected to be discreet about the incident, too. NB: If a major accident occurs, unwritten rules of etiquette dictate that the guilty gun never shoots again

-       Restrain yourself: a shoot is not the place for loud, bawdy behaviour

-       Under no circumstances should one shoot a white pheasant

-       Never swing your gun along the shooting line or in the direction of other guns

-       Make sure each bird shot is dead before proceeding onto the next one. It is better to use both barrels on one bird than two barrels on two birds (with the first barrel not yet fully killed).

-       Do also remember to tip the keeper. Anything from £15 upwards is usual; more if he has cleaned your gun.

Unsure about the terminology used in this blog? Next week: a beginner’s guide to shooting terms.

William Hanson
Tutor, The English Manner

Cowes Week

Hyacinth: Not incorrect but perhaps not that subtle

Hyacinth: Not incorrect but perhaps not that subtle

Cowes Week is the oldest regular regatta in the world. Unlike Henley, which began in 1839, Cowes was first held in 1826. It began following the Prince Regent’s (who became George IV) interesting in yachting. The first race at Cowes was held at 0930 on 10th August. It is now the tradition that Cowes Week takes place on the Solent from the first Saturday after the last Tuesday in July, until the following Saturday.

As well as the boating element, Cowes is much loved for its social cachet. Parties and live music have become as much of a part of the week as the yachts. On the Friday, a firework display is held, with the pyrotechnics being launched from barges around the waterfront. This tradition dates back more than 150 years. People attending Cowes should be aware that this particular tradition may not happen at this year’s event due to lack of funding.

Now, what to wear? Alexandra Messervy, Founder of The English Manner, gives us the following advice: ‘Stick to looking the part in deck shoes, sunglasses, windproof gear and a chance to wear that perfect Hermes headscarf (or a good imitation from tie Rack!) – and there are plenty of wonderful wellies around if the weather is wet’.

Also – for gentlemen that wish to wear blazers please don’t have an emblem on the top-pocket. Very Non-U.

Do also remember that if you get the chance to go on board one of the yachts, it is required that you do not board until given permission. Once on deck, soft-soled shoes or no shoes at all.

The English Manner are always happy to answer any specific comments about any aspect of protocol. Please see our website for contact details, or just comment on this blog post.

William Hanson
Tutor, The English Manner

The Ashes

lords

Lords Cricket Ground

Cricket is a game of frankly puzzling social contexts. A sport invented by farm labourers, adopted by the ruling classes and now the sport of Middle England. Yet regardless of its history, cricket still represents a major section of British sport, and its showpiece event is undoubtedly the Ashes. This year, the series begins on 8th July and is set to end in late August.

Played between England and Australia every other year, the historic event attracts thousands of cricket fans to various cricket grounds across the country. This year’s series will be no different and so it is important to remember cricketing protocol.

Cricket has long been seen as a game for gentlemen and maintains the values of fair play and sportsmanship. This year is no different, with the Australian cricket board writing to every member of their squad forbidding the practise of ‘sledging’, whereby the fielding team uses verbal insults to put off the opposing batsmen.

This type of gamesmanship however can also periodically extend to the stands and supporters should be aware that abusive remarks, chants or banners directed at any player or fellow spectator is out of place in the modern game, and indeed, always has been.

However matters of cricketing etiquette usually stem from other areas, such as dress code, singing and the consumption of food and drink. In the terraces there is no set dress code and nowadays inventive and colourful dress in often encouraged. However, those attending a match in an executive box or from the confines of the exclusive pavilion, such as the one at Lords, are generally expected to wear at least a collared shirt and slacks, often with a jacket and tie.

As for singing and chanting, again the location is all-important. From inside the terraces, vocal support is encouraged (in moderation) so long as it is not whilst the bowler is making his run up, whereas within the pavilion applause is the most acceptable form of appreciation.

Unlike other sports such as football, cricket spectators are permitted to consume alcohol whilst watching the match. However, all beverages must be purchased at the ground and excessive consumption is prohibited and the club bar has the right to stop serving spectators who are believed to be rowdy.

Further advice on this event – or any other event in the Season – can be obtained on request from The English Manner (www.theenglishmanner.com).

James Hanson


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